Photography Podcast

PhotoNetCast #67 – Intro to Macro Photography

Posted in PhotoNetCast Shows on 14-03-2012 | 2 Comments

Macro Photography

 

Want to shoot the tiny stuff in life? All the bugs, all the details in flowers, all the details in the small objects? Then this episode is for you.

I am joined by Dave Wilson, Will Burrard-Lucas and Teymur Madjderey for a discussion in Macro Photography.

Up close on the Head“Up Close on the Head”

Extreme macro of a screw head with Phillips indentions. The original object is about 5mm wide and the image was not cropped.

 

 

We talk about some gear such as dedicated macro lenses (including the difference between macro lenses and zoom lenses with a macro stamped on it), extension tubes and close-up filters, without forgetting the good old trick of reversing lenses. We approach lighting in macro photography and we give a few tips to improve focus, exposure and background. Will also shared the setup for his amazing photos of mosquitoes.

Regarding post processing, we mentioned focus stacking and stitching.

On the news, we talk about the 5D MkIII, the almost end for Kodak’s slide film, the announced 41MP on Nokia’s new smartphone, and the latest news from BeetleCam.

Enjoy the show…

 

Unedited video of the live recording is below the Show Notes.

 

A big thanks also to everyone that followed the show live.

 

Show Notes

 

Selected from the Web

Comments (2)

Currently I’m using the reverse lens method. I have a vintage 35mm stacked backward on a modified tele-converter. IMO, the results compared to the price cannot be beat. For $50 (or much less if you already have vintage wide-angles lying around), you can get crisp, lovely results. Still working on light modifiers, though.

Here’s a sample of one of my faves so far using this technique:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/45517597@N07/7157262828/

(you can see the photo larger by clicking the magnifying glass on flickr, the larger the screen the better)

I also wanted to add that there’s editing software for ‘focus stacking,’ which yield out of this world results for a lot of photographers.

Great podcast, thanks!

Just continued the podcast and got to the focus stacking part 😉



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